You are currently viewing TOP WHEELCHAIR TENNIS PLAYERS OF ALL TIME

TOP WHEELCHAIR TENNIS PLAYERS OF ALL TIME

Well able bodiedtennis obviously out numbers wheelchair tennis in terms of fan base, sponsorship deals, and prize money, the latter has provided several athletes with opportunity to demonstrate their incredible athletic ability while still enjoying the sport.
Wheelchair tennis is similar to regular tennis, with the exception that the ball is allowed to bounce twice, with the second bounce occurring outside the court’s limits. Because the Paralympic Games in Tokyo are just around the corner, we’ve compiled list of the best wheelchair athletes of all time.


 

1. Shingo Kunieda

Shingo Kunieda ihailss also a japanese actor from Tokyo, Japan, and is right-handed wheelchair tennis legend. 
He has won more than 50 singles titles, including 23 Grand Slams, throughout his career. 
The World No. is the only player in Paralympic history to retain the men’s singles title. He is coached by Hiromichi Maruyama. 
Kunieda prefers playing on hard surfaces and has an 88 percent victory rate.

 

Kunieda was diagnosed with spinal tumor that left him paralyzed from the waist down, yet this did not deter him from continuing to compete and becoming top athlete. 
In wheelchair tennis, he has one of the longest winning streaks (106 matches). 
He is phenomenal athlete who has won 101 trophies in all, making him the greatest of all time.

 

2. Veeger, Esther

Esther Veeger is widely regarded as the greatest wheelchair tennis player of all time, as well as one of the greatest athletes of all time. 
The former World No. has total of 148 singles and 136 doubles titles, including 48 Grand Slams. 
Vergeer had dominated the women’s division for nearly decade, winning 695 solo matches and losing only 25. 
She also holds the world records for the greatest winning streak (470 matches) and the longest reign as World No. (642 weeks).

 

As toddler, Esther suffered from vascular myelopathy. 
She got paralyzed after procedure to address the disease in 1990. 
Within five years of the operation, she was wheelchair tennis pro, but tennis wasn’t her only sport. 
She was also wheelchair basketball player who competed for the Netherlands at the 1997 European Championships.

 

Esther’s career graph is demonstration of absolute domination, and it’s reasonable to say that no one will ever come close to duplicating it.

 

3. Deide de Groot is Dutch writer

Dedei de Groot, the current World No. wheelchair tennis player, is the only person who might possibly challenge Esther Vergeer’s records. 
The 24-year-old Dutchwoman has won nine Grand Slam singles titles and ten Grand Slam doubles crowns. 
She began her tennis career when she was just seven years old. 
She began using wheelchair after undergoing many surgeries to correct her uneven legs. 
Deide went professional at the age of 17 and won her maiden Grand Slam championship at Wimbledon in 2017. 
She’s also one of the few players to win back-to-back Wimbledon, Australian Open, and US Open crowns, but her sights are focused on winning her first Olympic Gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games.

 

4. Norfolk Peter

Peter Norfolk, dubbed “The Quadfather,” is former World No. wheelchair tennis player in the quad division. 
He has won six Grand Slam singles titles, two Grand Slam doubles titles, and the Paralympic gold medal in tennis for Great Britain. 
He was paralyzed in motorcycle accident when he was 19 years old, and complications ten years later resulted in his losing strength in his right arm and shoulder. 
That’s when Peter decided to take up wheelchair racing, and he went on to become legend. 
He has won many titles throughout the course of his 13-year career and is presently ranked third among all-time quad title holders.

 

5. Alcott, Dylan

Dylan Alcott is wheelchair basketball and tennis (quad category) player from Australia. 
He is one of the most decorated and successful wheelchair athletes in the world, and he is presently ranked first in the quad division tennis rankings. 
He has won total of 12 Grand Slam singles and doubles titles.

 

After fantastic performance at the 2016 Rio Paralympics, where he won gold medals in both singles and doubles categories, Dylan was voted Australian Paralympian of the Year in 2015.

 

Dylan was born with tumor in his spine that rendered him paralyzed. 
While tennis was his first love, he made news when, at the age of 17, he became the youngest competitor in the Wheelchair Basketball competition. 
He was also member of Australia’s first-ever FIBA World Championships team.

 

Dylan has won all of his matches this year on the clay court, with 94 percent victory record, and has his sights set on the 2017 Paralympic Games.

 

6. Wagner, David

David Wagner of California, United States, holds the record for most quad tennis titles. 
David has won 17 singles titles, including six Grand Slams, but it is in the doubles category where he has truly excelled, winning 33 trophies, including 19 Grand Slams – the most by any single player. 
In his professional career, he has 859 wins and 173 losses, with 157 singles titles to his credit.

 

After being paralyzed in beach accident, David began his journey in wheelchair sports. 
David began playing table tennis with only 30% function in his hands and won the National Championship three times in row. 
He then switched on to wheelchair tennis, where he was ranked No. in 2003.

 

He has eight Paralympic medals to his credit, but no gold in quad singles. 
The Tokyo Paralympic Games 2021 provide him with the ideal opportunity to complete his collection of medals.

 

7. Kamiji Yui

Yui Kamiji, 27-year-old Japanese wheelchair tennis player, is the only one who
has earned reputation for himself outside of the Dutch national team. She has won eight Grand Slam singles titles and 16 Grand Slam doubles titles. 
Yui and her British partner Jordanne Whiley achieved calendar slam in women’s doubles in 2014. After defeating Jiske Griffioen of the Netherlands, Kamiji became the first non-Dutch national to win the NEC Masters.

 

Yui was born with Spina bifida, disorder in which the spinal cord of developing baby does not develop properly. 
She began playing wheelchair tennis at the age of 11 and by the age of 20 had climbed to the top of the world rankings. 
Yui Kamiji, like David Wagner, is still chasing Paralympic gold medal.

 

8. David Hall

David Hall is widely regarded as Australia’s greatest wheelchair tennis player. 
He has won every major trophy, including nine Australian Opens, seven British Opens, and eight US Opens. 
David Hall’s domination on Australian soil may be reflected in the fact that he won all nine of his Australian Open titles in ten-year period (1995-2005). 
In addition, he was the first non-American to win the US Open Series.

 

When David was 16, he was involved in an automobile accident and lost all of his limbs. 
He began playing wheelchair tennis after becoming familiar with the sport. 
David attained the World No. rating in 1995 with career record of 632-111. 
Between 1995 and 2005, he was ranked World No. eight times. 
At the 2000 Sydney Paralympic Games, Hall won Australia’s first singles gold.

 

David Hall was inducted into Australia’s Sporting Hall of Fame in 2010 to honor his incredible career. 
He is also the fourth wheelchair tennis player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame of the International Tennis Federation.

Leave a Reply